All posts by kerrynesbit

This Sunday

All are welcome this Sunday, March 26, the Fourth Sunday in Lent.

The Rev. D. Dixon Kinser will preach.

  • Holy Eucharist at 7:45, 9:00 and 11:15 a.m. in the nave
  • Choral Eucharist at 5:00 p.m. in the chapel

The Men’s Ministry will serve breakfast this Sunday between 8:00 and 9:30 a.m. in Colhoun B and C.

This Sunday through April 9, St. Paul’s clergy is preaching a sermon series titled, A Know-It-All, a Woman of Ill Repute, A Blind Man and a Dead Guy: A Sermon Series on John’s Gospel.

This Sunday through April 9, at 10:15 to 11:00 a.m. in Colhoun A, St. Paul’s Clergy is presenting a Rector’s Forum series, So What? The Governance of God, Part 2.

All are welcome to attend Episcopal 101 Confirmation Classes. This Sunday’s topic is Signs and Symbols. Classes meet at 10:15 a.m. in the chapel.

On the final Undie Sunday, March 26, St. Paul’s will collect new underwear, diapers and pull-ups in all sizes for boys and girls and new towels and washcloths for the Salvation Army’s Center of Hope family residence. Leave your donations in the specially marked collection boxes in the Goodheart Entrance and outside the chapel.

Visit an online liturgical calendar listing the readings for Sundays and major Holy Days from the Revised Common Lectionary.

Sundays for Children and Youth

The Daily Office

Continuing through April 12, St. Paul’s will offer Morning Prayer weekdays at 8:15 a.m. in the chancel area of the nave.

Evening Prayer will be offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays through April 11, at 5:30 p.m. in the chancel area of the nave.

Compline will be offered in the nave on Sundays through April 9, at 6:15 p.m. following the 5:00 p.m. service and on Wednesdays, March 8 through April 5, in the chapel at 7:00 p.m. following this year’s Lenten Supper Series programs.

Parishioners are encouraged to volunteer as officiants by contacting the Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves at (336) 723-4391, ext. 1211, or sardrey-graves@stpauls-ws.org.

Wednesday Supper Series

The first four sessions of the Wednesday Supper Series, titled The First Word: A Bible Study NOT for the Faint-of-Heart will be presented March 8, 15, 22 and 29, 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. in Colhoun A.

Have you ever heard the scripture reading in church and wanted to raise your hand and ask a question? Have you ever hoped that the preacher would talk about a specific issue from the Bible story, but it wasn’t addressed? Have you ever wanted to hear your own words from the pulpit? If so, our Lenten Wednesday Supper Series Bible study is for you. Join us for an engaging study of vignettes from the Gospel of John and other lessons. Wednesday night discussions will provide the content of the preacher’s sermon on the following Sunday morning. Bring all your insights, wisdom, questions, grumpy attitudes and struggles with the Bible. All are welcome to share in a rich dialogue on the issues of scripture and how people of different perspectives read it. The four-part series will be led by St. Paul’s clergy.

The John’s Gospel reading will serve as the primary basis for the Wednesday night studies. Clergy will also discuss other upcoming lectionary readings as time permits. A schedule of the readings for each week is available online for participants who would like read them in advance.

The Wednesday Supper Series will conclude April 5 with a session led by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser, titled Christ Our Passover is Sacrificed for Us: Jesus, the Passover and the Eucharist. In the formation of what we now know to be the Eucharist, Jesus picked a very specific Jewish holiday, the Passover, as the framework for his final experience of the Last Supper with his disciples. Dixon will explore the symbols of Passover and how they now shape our prayers and celebration of Holy Eucharist and how these holy meals influence our practice of faith in Holy Week and Easter.

All five Wednesday night parish gatherings include supper and a program in Colhoun A. Supper for the whole family will be from 5:30 to 6:15 p.m. Programs will be presented from 6:15 to 7:00 p.m., followed by Compline in the chapel.

Late-comers are welcome to eat during the program.

The cost for supper will be $7 for adults and $5 for children younger than 12, with a maximum cost per family of $20.

After supper, child care for children three years old and younger will be available in room 107 off the Preschool hallway. A program centered on Holy Week will be offered for Pre-K students through fifth graders in Room 305 beside the library.

Lenten Sermon Series

On Sundays in Lent, March 12 through April  9, St. Paul’s clergy will preach a sermon series titled, A Know-It-All, a Woman of Ill Repute, A Blind Man and a Dead Guy: A Sermon Series on John’s Gospel. Each week, clergy will reflect on scenes in John’s Gospel, integrating the wisdom learned from the Wednesday Supper Series Bible study the previous week.

Rector’s Forum Lenten Adult Formation Series

On Sundays in Lent, March 12, through April 9, at 10:15 to 11:00 a.m. in Colhoun A, St. Paul’s Clergy will present So What? The Governance of God, Part 2.

American society was built on the principle that all people should have access to things like education and opportunity in order to secure a bright future for themselves. But we know all too well that our country has fallen short of these ideals in recent years. Education, family life, community and income are all caught in the flux of politics, and American children are paying the price.

Christian churches, however, have the power to effect positive change on this grim reality. In the Kingdom of God, we are called by God to care for the “least of these,” and that includes not only caring for individual children and adults, but working to change the broken systems of education, income and community that promote situations of poverty.

How might we renew our commitment to this vision at St. Paul’s? How are we called to live differently as a result of our faith and work for change in our communities?

This Lent, join us for our second adult forum series on the Governance of God. Using the text Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis by Robert D. Putnam, the clergy of St. Paul’s will lead a series of discussions about how we might dedicate ourselves to a new future for the most vulnerable people of our society.

  • March 12: “American Dream: Myths and Realities,”
    led by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser
  • March 19: “American Families,”
    led by the Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves
  • March 26: “American Income and Jobs,”
    led by the Rev. John E. Shields
  • April 2: “American Education,”
    led by the Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves
  • April 9: “American Community,”
    led by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser

Episcopal 101

What’s a thurible? Why do we read so many Scripture lessons in church? What is the Episcopal Church doing to offer aid in the war in Syria? These and many other Episcopal questions will be addressed during our winter-spring session of Episcopal 101 on Sunday mornings at 10:15 a.m.

Class Topics

  • March 26: Signs and Symbols
  • April 2: Outreach

The class is open to all members of St. Paul’s—newcomers and old-timers alike. Youth confirmands and mentors must attend all sessions to be confirmed on April 30.

Adults being confirmed or received into the church should also attend. Adult confirmands’ forms are due March 31.

Classes will meet in the chapel.

Teachers will be the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser, the Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves, the Rev. John E. Shields and Nick Vanhorn.

Undie Sundays

On Undie Sundays, March 12, 19 and 26, St. Paul’s will collect new underwear, diapers and pull-ups in all sizes for boys and girls for the Salvation Army’s Center of Hope family residence.

The shelter also needs new bath towels and washcloths.

Leave your donations in the specially marked collection boxes in the Goodheart Entrance and outside the chapel.

The Center of Hope is Forsyth County’s only emergency homeless residence for families, housing single mothers, single fathers, married parents and single women. On any given day, more than 50 children 12 and younger call the Center of Hope home.

The Stations of the Cross

St. Paul’s clergy will lead the Stations of the Cross liturgy in the nave at noon on Wednesdays from March 8 through April 12. Parishioners may walk the Stations of the Cross in the nave and chapel on their own during church office hours throughout Lent. Booklets containing the liturgy will be available at the back of the nave and on the table outside the chapel.

The Labyrinth

The Labyrinth will be open all day on Wednesdays during Lent, from March 8 through April 12, with a special emphasis on the time from 4:15 to 5:15 p.m., right before the 5:30 Eucharist in the chapel.

Based on the labyrinth in the floor of Chartres Cathedral in France, St. Paul’s Labyrinth is etched into the floor of the chapel, a balanced, circular walking path with seven concentric circles, leading from an outer entry point to the center. As a true labyrinth, it offers a single, purposeful pathway, with no dead ends, and can be walked by people of all faiths. Some people pray as they walk, opening their minds and hearts to God’s peace and the presence of the Holy Spirit, while others meditate, as they follow the path to the center and back out again into the world.

Vacation Bible School

Registration is now open for Vacation Bible School, to be offered from 9:00 a.m. until noon, Monday July 31 through Friday, August 4, in Colhoun A.

This year’s theme is Rome: Paul and the Underground Church. Guided by St. Paul, children will explore a crowded Roman marketplace, tiptoe past watchful Roman guards, encourage first-century Christians who meet in a dark cave, race chariots and make daily discoveries about God’s love.

Register

Between now and June 1, registration is open to St. Paul’s parishioners, Preschool families, Kids’ Café participants and families staying in the Salvation Army Homeless Shelter. From June 2 through July 21, registration opens to the general public. Registration is limited to 100 children.

The cost is $15 for one child and $10 for each additional sibling, payable at the time of registration. Scholarships are available.

The first 40 families to register and the first 10 adult volunteers receive a free CD. Additional CDs are available for $10 each.

Download a registration form

Please mail your check and your completed registration form to:

The Rev. Lauren A. Villemuer-Drenth
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
520 Summit Street
Winston-Salem, NC 27101

Scholarships are available. For details, contact Deacon Lauren at (336) 723-4391, ext. 1220, or lvillemuer-drenth@stpauls-ws.org.

 Volunteer

Volunteers are needed!  Download a volunteer form to see the opportunities available to adults and youth in sixth grade and higher.

Contact

For information or to volunteer, contact the Rev. Lauren A. Villemuer-Drenth, Director of Children’s Ministries, at lvillemuer-drenth@stpauls-ws.org.

Parish Weekend at Kanuga

St. Paul’s Parish Weekend at Kanuga Conference Center in Hendersonville will be Friday, May 5 through Sunday, May 7.

The weekend will be a wonderful time to leave behind the stresses of daily life and connect with God and other members of our parish family. Weekend activities include s’mores by the campfire, Saturday evening dinner, nature walks, worship by the lake and much more! Additional information, including rates, is available on the registration form.

A registration table will be set up outside the Colhoun Room during the Wednesday Supper Series, March 22 and 29 and on Sunday, March 26 and April 2. All registrations are due by Sunday, April 2.

Register online

Contact Donna Hennessey at hennessey.d@gmail.com or (336) 414-9749.

ECW Spring Luncheon

The ECW Spring Luncheon, featuring guest speaker Tommy Brown, author of The Seven Money Types: Discover How God Wired You to Handle Money, will be held on Monday, April 3, at 11:30 a.m. in Colhoun A.

Brown, a minister and graduate of Wake Forest’s School of Divinity, is Executive Director, Account Management and Planning, for University Advancement at Wake Forest University. He was recently featured in a Winston-Salem Journal article.

All adult women of the church are invited to attend. All whose surnames begin with A through M are asked to bring sandwiches and salads. N through Z are asked to bring desserts.

Child care will be available if requested. Contact Bonnie Flythe at bonniewflythe@gmail.com.

ReadWS Information Sessions

ReadWS is hosting information sessions in the coming months for those interested in tutoring struggling readers. Sessions will be held:

  • Wednesday, April 5 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Clemmons Library, 3554 Clemmons Road in Clemmons
  • Thursday, May 11 from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the United Metropolitan Missionary Baptist church, 450 Metropolitan Drive in Winston-Salem
  • Wednesday, June 14 from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Main Street United Methodist Church, 306 South Main Street in Kernersville

Contact Pam Blizard at (336) 723-4391, ext. 1509, or pam@readws.org if you plan to attend.

Palm Cross Workshop

The Altar Guild invites parishioners to its annual Palm Cross Workshop on Thursday, April 6, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in rooms 305 – 306. The crosses will be distributed at services on Palm Sunday. Lunch will be served at noon. Donations for lunch will be greatly appreciated. Contact Peggy Slater at pslater@stpauls-ws.org if you plan to attend.

Friends of Music Concert

On Friday, April 7, at 7:00 p.m., the Friends of Music Series at St. Paul’s will present the St. Paul’s Chamber Choir and a string quartet from the North Carolina Baroque Orchestra performing Franz Joseph Haydn’s The Seven Last Words of Christ.

This work, considered by many to be one of the composer’s finest, was originally written for orchestra and chorus, but Haydn also set it for orchestra alone and string quartet. There was also a keyboard reduction approved by the composer.

The Seven Last Words of Christ is comprised of an introduction, seven slow movements corresponding to the seven words, and a final chorus depicting the earthquake following the crucifixion. In this performance, the choir will sing the seven words and the final chorus. The string quartet will play the introduction and the slow movements following each word.

Members of the string quartet are David Wilson and Martha Perry, violin, Joey O’Donnell, viola, and Barbara Krumdieck, cello.

The concert is open to the public. An offering will be taken to support the Friends of Music series at St. Paul’s.

Men’s Monday Dinner

St. Paul’s Men’s Ministry invites the men of the parish to gather in the Colhoun Room on Monday, April 10, from 5:30 to 6:00 for socializing and from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. for dinner and a program by Madison Spencer, an architect based in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Spencer’s program, titled, “!Carpe Diem! !Carpe Mortuus!” will focus on memorials and burials within or around churches and their importance not only to a parish but to the community at large.

The cost for dinner is $10, payable at the door. No reservation is required, but those who plan to attend are asked to email Tom McDowell at tmcdowell@stpauls-ws.org.

Madison Spencer has practiced architecture from offices in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Newport, Rhode Island, for more than 25 years.  His scholarship and efforts in the world of classical architecture and preservation have resulted in numerous architectural awards and an appointment to the board of the Department of Historic Resources for the Commonwealth of Virginia on which he served for seven years.

Spencer has also served as an adviser for several historic churches up and down the eastern seaboard. That and the demise of older relations led Spencer to rethink the whole notion of burial and what it means to honor the dead and celebrate a life within a community.  This research resulted in several patents for “Columbarium Arks,” some of which have been recently installed in Lexington, Virginia, at R. E. Lee Episcopal Church on the campus of Washington & Lee University.

Madison Spencer is also an ardent admirer of Ralph Adams Cram’s good work, including St. Paul’s, having devoted several years to studying his oeuvre including All Saints Chapel at Sewanee, where Spencer’s eldest daughter is a student.  Spencer will speak on memorialization within historic churches and how that may be a model for the future in a fragmented society.

Day Trip to Charlotte

St. Paul’s Senior Adults will sponsor a day trip to Charlotte on Tuesday, April 11, hosted by parishioner Bill Weeks, a retired pilot. The bus will leave the upper parking lot at 8:15 a.m. and return by 5:00 p.m.

The first stop will be the Carolinas Aviation Museum where the “miracle on the Hudson” aircraft flown by Captain Sully Sullenberger and First Officer Jeff Skiles on January 15, 2009, is on display. Bill flew this same Airbus A-320 a number of times prior to Sully’s landing it on the Hudson. Bill also attended the National Transportation Safety Board’s US Airways 1549 accident hearing in Washington, DC.

The group will also visit the Billy Graham Library, eating lunch at the Graham Brothers Dairy Bar and touring the facility, which traces the life of Billy Graham from his humble beginning to international fame. Both Bill Weeks and Lee Bettis recommend the Billy Graham Library as well worth a visit.

To reserve your place on the trip, send a check for $25 per person, payable to St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, with “Charlotte senior trip” in the memo line, to Senior Adults Minister Anne Rahn. Lunch cost is on your own.

Contact Anne at (336) 723-4797 or arahn@stpauls-ws.org.

Bazaar Chairs Needed

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Women are looking for volunteers to chair the 71st Annual Bazaar and Luncheon, scheduled for November 8, 2017.

This event offers fellowship, food, treasures and crafts to appeal to our whole community. Many experienced volunteers have already signed up to help make this year’s event a success.

If you are interested in playing a leadership role in one of the longest-standing traditions of our parish, contact ECW President Christine Storch at christinekstorch@gmail.com.

April Senior Luncheon

On Wednesday, April 19, St. Paul’s Senior Adults will welcome parishioner John C. Moskop, PhD, professor of Internal Medicine and Wallace and Mona Wu Professor of Biomedical Ethics at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.  John’s clinical interests include bioethics and ethical issues in emergency medicine and end-of-life care.

In his presentation, titled “Confronting Moral Questions in Health Care:   A Case Analysis Exercise,” John will present ethics consultation cases and guide the group in a discussion and analysis of the questions posed and possible responses.

Fellowship begins at 11:15 a.m. with lunch at 11:30 in the Colhoun Room. The program begins at noon. The cost is $6.00. All are welcome.

April Faith and Justice Program

The Faith & Justice Committee Lunch and Speaker Series, In My Backyard: Faith and Current Events, will continue Thursday, April 20, at 12:00 noon in Colhoun A.

The program, titled “The Hope of Healthy Futures: Bridges to Healing and Restoration for Children and Families,” will feature Brandon Cathey, Senior Advancement Officer at Crossnore School and Children’s Home and Linda Devine, District Administrator for the Forsyth County Guardian Ad Litem Program.

Providing support, care and guidance to children and families facing challenges requires us to meet them where they are and offer paths to wholeness. Cathey and Devine will discuss how their organizations offer opportunities for healing and change in the midst of personal challenges.

Bring your own lunch. Beverages will be provided. All are welcome.

Jail and Prison Ministries Training

The Forsyth Jail and Prison Ministries will offer a training session for volunteers on Sunday, April 23, from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. at St. Peter’s World Outreach Center, 3683 Old Lexington Road, Winston-Salem, NC 27107.

St. Paul’s Prison Ministry conducts a worship service at the jail four times a year. Current volunteers must receive this training annually to remain active in the ministry. Upon completing the training, new volunteers may begin serving after the jail staff processes their applications.

Trainees must be at least 21 years old and are asked to bring a photocopy of their driver’s license or other photo ID to the training session.

Contact Temp or Amy Elliott at (336) 924-6790 or nthia19@aol.com.

Senior Trip to Kanuga

St. Paul’s Senior Adults will visit Kanuga Conference Center Thursday and Friday, May 25 and 26, staying at the recently renovated Kanuga Lake Inn.

The group will travel by coach bus, leaving the St. Paul’s parking lot at 8:30 Thursday morning and arriving at Kanuga in time for lunch. After lunch, group members can visit Connemara, Carl Sandburg’s home in nearby Flat Rock, or enjoy the afternoon on their own at Kanuga.

Mark Upright, Kanuga COO, will socialize with the group before dinner to give an update on the conference center. After dinner, the group will enjoy game night, featuring bridge, Chronology and other favorite card and board games.

Following breakfast at Kanuga Friday morning, the group will visit Western North Carolina Nature Center. Owned by the City of Asheville, the WNC Nature Center is dedicated to connecting people with animals and plants of the Southern Appalachians.

The group’s final stop before heading home is Phil’s Bar-B-Cue Pit in Black Mountain. The bus is expected to arrive back in Winston-Salem by 5:30 p.m.

The total cost for the trip is $200 (double room) or $238 (single room). To reserve your place, mail a check to Senior Adults Minister Anne Rahn, payable to St. Paul’s with “senior Kanuga trip” noted in the memo line, for the full amount or a deposit of $125 with the balance due Tuesday, May 4.

Call Anne at (336) 723-4797 for more information.

Sunday, December 13, 2015, Rector’s Forum

“A Season of Giving?”
Presented Sunday, December 13, 2015, by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser

Right click to download the mp3 file

At a time of year when we are presented with so many opportunities to give, what are we, as Christians, to do when directly confronted by those known as “panhandlers?” How do we give in that context? Or do we give at all? Dixon discussed the theology of Christian giving and offered some brass-tacks practical advice for dealing with those who confront us to solicit our gifts.

Living While Black

Thursday, November 19, 2015
The Faith & Justice Committee Lunch and Speaker Series, In My Backyard: Faith and Current Events, continued on Thursday, November 19. The program, titled, “Beyond the Headlines: Living While Black,” featured parishioners Joyce Jacob-Mua and her son Louis-Patrick Mua and the Rev. Lawrence Womack, Rector of St. Anne’s Episcopal Church. Their conversation focused on the challenges racism imposes on everyday life for African Americans. The Rev. D. Dixon Kinser facilitated.

Right click to download the mp3 file

Sunday, November 1, 2015, Rector’s Forum

“The Beautitudes, Part 6 of 6”
Presented Sunday, November 1, 2015, by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser

Right click to download the mp3 file

Starting on Sunday, September 20, and concluding on November 1, 2015, the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser presented Blessed Are: The Beatitudes. Blessed are the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the meek, those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, the merciful, the pure in heart, the peacemakers, and those who get insulted. They are all named as blessed by Jesus. But what does that mean, why is it important, and why would Jesus kick off his longest recorded sermon with all these blessing proclamations? Parishioners joined Dixon in a six-session deep dive into this group of sayings, often called the Beatitudes, with discussions about the meaning of blessings, and what it means for our lives today.

November 1, 2015, Class by David Nelson

“How God Came to Be: An Exploration of the Trinity”
Living the Trinity
Presented November 1, 2015, by Dr. David Nelson

Right click to download the mp3 file

Dr. David Nelson presented a six-part series, How God Came to Be: An Exploration of the Trinity, on Sundays in the chapel, beginning September 20 and concluding November 1, 2015. The class explored the doctrine of the Trinity by considering how it came to be within the context of the church’s witness and worship.

Sunday, October 25, 2015, Rector’s Forum

“The Beautitudes, Part 5 of 6”
Presented Sunday, October 25, 2015, by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser

Right click to download the mp3 file

Starting on Sunday, September 20, and concluding on November 1, 2015, the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser presented Blessed Are: The Beatitudes. Blessed are the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the meek, those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, the merciful, the pure in heart, the peacemakers, and those who get insulted. They are all named as blessed by Jesus. But what does that mean, why is it important, and why would Jesus kick off his longest recorded sermon with all these blessing proclamations? Parishioners joined Dixon in a six-session deep dive into this group of sayings, often called the Beatitudes, with discussions about the meaning of blessings, and what it means for our lives today.

Law Enforcement and the African American Community, Part 2

“Law Enforcement and the African American Community, Part 2”
Presented October 22, 2015, at St. Paul’s

Right click to download the mp3 file

The Faith & Justice Committee Lunch and Speaker Series, In My Backyard: Faith and Current Events, continued on Thursday, October 22, from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. in the Colhoun Room. The program featured parishioner Joyce Jacob-Mua and Winston-Salem Chief of Police Barry Rountree. The Rev. D. Dixon Kinser, Rector, and the Rev. Corey Miller facilitated the discussion.

Sunday, October 18, 2015, Rector’s Forum

“The Beautitudes, Part 4 of 6”
Presented Sunday, October 18, 2015, by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser

Right click to download the mp3 file

Starting on Sunday, September 20, and concluding on November 1, 2015, the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser presented Blessed Are: The Beatitudes. Blessed are the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the meek, those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, the merciful, the pure in heart, the peacemakers, and those who get insulted. They are all named as blessed by Jesus. But what does that mean, why is it important, and why would Jesus kick off his longest recorded sermon with all these blessing proclamations? Parishioners joined Dixon in a six-session deep dive into this group of sayings, often called the Beatitudes, with discussions about the meaning of blessings, and what it means for our lives today.

Sunday, October 4, 2015, Rector’s Forum

“The Beautitudes, Part 3 of 6”
Presented Sunday, October 4, 2015, by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser

Right click to download the mp3 file

Starting on Sunday, September 20, and concluding on November 1, 2015, the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser presented Blessed Are: The Beatitudes. Blessed are the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the meek, those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, the merciful, the pure in heart, the peacemakers, and those who get insulted. They are all named as blessed by Jesus. But what does that mean, why is it important, and why would Jesus kick off his longest recorded sermon with all these blessing proclamations? Parishioners joined Dixon in a six-session deep dive into this group of sayings, often called the Beatitudes, with discussions about the meaning of blessings, and what it means for our lives today.

Sunday, September 27, 2015, Rector’s Forum

“The Beautitudes, Part 2 of 6”
Presented Sunday, September 27, 2015, by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser

Right click to download the mp3 file

Starting on Sunday, September 20, and concluding on November 1, 2015, the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser presented Blessed Are: The Beatitudes. Blessed are the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the meek, those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, the merciful, the pure in heart, the peacemakers, and those who get insulted. They are all named as blessed by Jesus. But what does that mean, why is it important, and why would Jesus kick off his longest recorded sermon with all these blessing proclamations? Parishioners joined Dixon in a six-session deep dive into this group of sayings, often called the Beatitudes, with discussions about the meaning of blessings, and what it means for our lives today.

Law Enforcement and the African American Community

“Law Enforcement and the African American Community”
Presented September 24, 2015, at St. Paul’s

Please note: This recording includes the soundtrack of a video containing profanity.

Right click to download the mp3 file

The Faith & Justice Committee Lunch and Speaker Series, In My Backyard: Faith and Current Events, returned for its third season on Thursday, September 24, from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. in the Colhoun Room. The program was the first of a two-part series titled, “Beyond the Headlines: Law Enforcement and the African-American Community.” The September 24 session was a conversation with John Lewis, St. Paul’s Building and Grounds Supervisor, a Mason and former football player and winner of the Brian Piccolo Award at Wake Forest University, and Mark Davidson, a retired N.C. Highway Patrol Officer and candidate for Deacon in the Episcopal Church. Also participating in the conversation were St. Paul’s Rector the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser and the Rev. Corey Miller.

Sunday, September 20, 2015, Rector’s Forum

“The Beautitudes, Part 1 of 6”
Presented Sunday, September 20, 2015, by the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser

Right click to download the mp3 file

Starting on Sunday, September 20, and concluding on November 1, 2015, the Rev. D. Dixon Kinser presented Blessed Are: The Beatitudes. Blessed are the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the meek, those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, the merciful, the pure in heart, the peacemakers, and those who get insulted. They are all named as blessed by Jesus. But what does that mean, why is it important, and why would Jesus kick off his longest recorded sermon with all these blessing proclamations? Parishioners joined Dixon in a six-session deep dive into this group of sayings, often called the Beatitudes, with discussions about the meaning of blessings, and what it means for our lives today.