Category Archives: Christian Formation

Choosing Wisely

The Rev. D. Dixon Kinser will present Choosing Wisely: The Wisdom of the Proverbs for a High-Anxiety Digital Age at 10:15 a.m. in Colhoun A on September 24, October 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29.

Have you ever had trouble sleeping because you were worried about something? Have you ever wondered why entertainment news gets as much airtime as humanitarian crises? Do you ever question if our culture has lost the ability to discern what is truly important and what is not?

If these questions resonate with you, then there is good news for you: you are not alone. Human beings have wrestled with these same issues for thousands of years and there is a whole body of literature to help us navigate them: The Wisdom Tradition.

Join Dixon for a six-week Bible study exploring the history, theology and central themes of the book of Proverbs. Proverbs means “to choose” and this class will demonstrate the ways ancient wisdom can help us all to choose wisely in an age of fake news, celebrity gossip and high anxiety.

Episcopal 202

The Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves and the Rev. Darby O. Everhard will teach a six-part class, Episcopal 202, at 10:15 a.m. on Sunday, October 15, 22, 29, November 5, 12, 19 in the chapel.

Have you ever felt stuck and unable to move forward in your faith? Are you struggling with deeper engagement with a ministry that is meaningful to you?

Whether you are new to the Episcopal Church, new to St. Paul’s, or have been here for a long time, this is a common experience. All Christians struggle sometimes with knowing their own spiritual gifts and figuring out how to use them.

Episcopal 202 is designed to orient us to the distinctly Anglican ways of prayer, worship, fellowship and service through the various ministries at St. Paul’s. Come learn how you might grow deeper in your faith in the coming year.

October Faith & Justice Program

The Faith & Justice Committee Lunch and Speaker Series, In My Backyard: Faith and Current Events, will continue its 2017-18 speaker series on Thursday, October 26, at 12:00 noon in Colhoun A.

The speaker will be John Senior, PhD, Director of the Art of Ministry Program and Assistant Teaching Professor of Ethics and Society Wake Forest University School of Divinity. His program is titled, “Water Rich, Water Poor: Water Security in an Age of Climate Change.”

Under the conditions of climate change, water is increasingly becoming a scarce resource. What obligations do Christians—particularly, Christians in the Global North whose access to resources is relatively secure—bear to those who face challenges to water and other forms of resource security?

Bring your own lunch. Beverages will be provided. All are welcome.

Saints and Sinners

The Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves will present “Saints and Sinners: Historical Figures as Role-Model Disciples” at 10:15 a.m. on November 5 in Colhoun A.

Do you think saints might be too good to be your model? Having role models in faith is an important part of every Christian’s formation, and while there’s no substitute for a model you can talk with, in church history we can uncover a new and vibrant source of new ways to learn about the life of faith. The class will talk about the scriptural basis for this approach and practical ideas about how to find mentors among the Communion of Saints.

The class is the first in a four-part series titled, Looking Back to the Future of Your Faith: Finding Models and Mentors in the Church’s History. Do you feel like your faith is less strong than you’d like it to be? Have you wondered how to find the right role models for faith? The Church’s history can be a way to see into the lives of people who have shared similar struggles. In this four-part series, speakers from St. Paul’s and beyond will be the guides to find examples of discipleship among Christians past and present.

Disciples in America

Dr. Grant Wacker, Gilbert T. Rowe Professor Emeritus of Christian History at Duke University Divinity School, will present “Disciples in America” at 10:15 a.m. on November 12 in Colhoun A.

Do you want to talk about faith or live it? The American Church is filled with great stories of people who went beyond talk. Christianity in America is a story of fascinating intersections: religious leaders who pioneered ways of reaching more people than ever before, leaders shaped quietly (and sometimes loudly) by their faith, and religious traditions old and new infused with a distinctly American flavor.

Dr. Wacker will use a selection of figures from American church history to illustrate ways of living out a committed faith with tradition, reason, distinct experience, and a fascination with identity. Dr. Wacker is the author or co-editor of seven books, including the recent award-winning biography, America’s Pastor: Billy Graham and the Shaping of a Nation. A celebrated teacher of generations of ministers, Dr. Wacker has also had a powerful impact on the field of church history, training dozens of active scholars.

The class is the second in a four-part series titled, Looking Back to the Future of Your Faith: Finding Models and Mentors in the Church’s History. Do you feel like your faith is less strong than you’d like it to be? Have you wondered how to find the right role models for faith? The Church’s history can be a way to see into the lives of people who have shared similar struggles. In this four-part series, speakers from St. Paul’s and beyond will be the guides to find examples of discipleship among Christians past and present.

November Faith and Justice Program

The Faith & Justice Committee Lunch and Speaker Series, In My Backyard: Faith and Current Events, will continue its 2017-18 speaker series on Thursday, November 16, at 12:00 noon in Colhoun A.

The speaker will be artist Mary Beth Blackwell-Chapman. Her program is titled, “Human Rights: An Artist’s Perspective.”

The concept of human rights emerged on a strong global stage after the horrors of World War II.  But when was the first formal declaration of human rights?

Cyrus the Great, Conqueror of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, ruled his people in 500 BC with a surprisingly enlightened view – even by modern standards.  Using her works of art, artist Mary Beth Blackwell-Chapman will share her thoughts on the vision of Cyrus.  How does art influence the conversation on human rights?  What does it mean for the 21st century?

Bring your own lunch. Beverages will be provided. All are welcome.

 

Disciples and Reformers

St. Paul’s welcomes the Rev. Dr. Bill Leonard who will present “Disciples & Reformers” at 10:15 a.m. on November 19 in Colhoun A. Leonard is the James and Marilyn Dunn Professor of Baptist Studies, Professor of Church History and former dean, Wake Forest University School of Divinity.

Can the reformers of the Church help you figure out how to grow and deepen your faith? The story of the Church is a story of reformation: sometimes in global tides of sentiment, and sometimes with local passion. As the world marks the 500th year of the Lutheran Reformation, we’ll take some time to consider a trio of reformers not as leaders of movements, but as people of deep faith themselves.

Bill Leonard is one of the most celebrated Baptist historians in America. His work crosses denominational lines to focus on his true passion: the wonder and varieties of religious expression. His most recent book conveys this in the title alone: The Homebrewed Christianity Guide to Church History: Flaming Heretics and Heavy Drinkers.

The class is the third in a four-part series titled, Looking Back to the Future of Your Faith: Finding Models and Mentors in the Church’s History. Do you feel like your faith is less strong than you’d like it to be? Have you wondered how to find the right role models for faith? The Church’s history can be a way to see into the lives of people who have shared similar struggles. In this four-part series, speakers from St. Paul’s and beyond will be the guides to find examples of discipleship among Christians past and present.

Disciples in Relief

Parishioner Matthew Phillips will teach a class titled, “Disciples in Relief” at 10:15 a.m. on November 26 in Colhoun A.

Are you worried that your favorite saint might be a sinner too? One advantage of historical role models is that we often have multiple views on their lives: in some cases, we can know these disciples better than people who share the pew with us. We’ll use Thomas More as an example: a celebrated Catholic saint with a controversial role in the English Reformation. Through literature and biography, we see commitment to strive for justice and a cautionary tale of overzealous faith.

St. Paul’s parishioner Matthew Phillips is the John Hendley Fellow, an associate teaching professor of law and ethics, and the director of the BB&T Center at Wake Forest University School of Business. Trained as a lawyer and minister, he teaches courses in business law and political economy with particular attention to the way professional identity can link the goals and aspirations of young people with the creation of value in their working lives.

The class concludes a four-part series titled, Looking Back to the Future of Your Faith: Finding Models and Mentors in the Church’s History. Do you feel like your faith is less strong than you’d like it to be? Have you wondered how to find the right role models for faith? The Church’s history can be a way to see into the lives of people who have shared similar struggles. In this four-part series, speakers from St. Paul’s and beyond will be the guides to find examples of discipleship among Christians past and present.