Category Archives: Christian Formation

The Good Book

The Rev. D. Dixon Kinser will offer a six-week series, The Good Book: How to Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest the Good News of the Bible on October 21 and 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and 25 at 10:15 a.m. in Colhoun A.

For Episcopal Christians, the Bible is the norming norm of our faith. We read it, sing it, preach it and build our doctrine on it. Yet for many the Bible remains opaque and mysterious. What is the Bible? Where did it come from? And what does it mean to believe it?

Dixon’s two-part, six-week Rector’s Forum series will explore these very questions. Part one of the class will explore of the history, nature, and origins of the Bible. Part two will employ those learnings through a study of the book of Jonah.

Compassion and Resilience in Family, Work and Faith

Dr. Susan Campbell will teach a class, Compassion and Resilience in Family, Work and Faith, on October 21 at 10:15 a.m. in the chapel, with a follow-up discussion on October 28 led by the Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves.

Loving our neighbors as ourselves can be a hard charge at times, for many reasons. Loving ourselves well is a necessary start. On October 21, Dr. Susan Campbell will discuss the role of compassion in empathy and resilience, and suggest ways we can nurture those traits in ourselves and in the people we love and lead.

On October 28, the Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves will lead a follow-up class for further discussion of ideas for practical application. Campbell is a clinical psychologist who has worked for almost 30 years in academic, medical, non-profit and private practice settings. Throughout her career, a primary focus has been on the development of practices and policies that improve the lives of children and families. A graduate of Davidson College and Georgia State University, she maintains a private practice in Charlotte, where she is an active member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church.

Faith and Justice October Program

The Faith & Justice Committee’s 2018-19 Lunch and Speaker Series will continue on Thursday, October 25, at 12:00 noon in Colhoun A.

The program, “Disrupting the Cycle of Poverty,” will be presented by the Rev. Kelly Carpenter, Senior Pastor of Green Street United Methodist Church and founder of The Shalom Project, and Crystal Little, a Wake Forest University School of Divinity student and Director of The Shalom Project’s “Flourish” program. The Shalom Project and the Circles USA program have learned why many efforts to help people move out of poverty fail. Carpenter and Little will share lessons learned that can shape a community strategy to stop managing the effects of poverty and start reducing poverty by disrupting the cycle.

Bring your own lunch. Beverages will be provided. All are welcome.

Stress and Health: A Deeper Dive into the Enneagram

The Rev. Sara C. Ardrey-Graves will offer a four-part class series, Stress and Health: A Deeper Dive into the Enneagram at 10:15 a.m. on November 4, 11, 18 and 25 in the chapel.

Do you ever feel disconnected from yourself when you’re stressed? Do you ever want to find ways to move back to a more healthy emotional place? Are you interested in exploring what health and flourishing looks like for your personality type?

We all respond differently to challenges and successes, and these reactions reveal a whole new level of depth to each person’s Enneagram type. The Christian tradition teaches us that God shapes us through the paths of forgiveness, reconciliation and amendment of life. The Enneagram is one way we can learn from our circumstances rather than constantly be reactive and spin in stress.

This course will serve as a continuation of last spring’s Enneagram class, as we study and explore each of the nine types as they reveal our best and worst selves.

Faith and Justice November Program

The Faith & Justice Committee’s 2018-19 Lunch and Speaker Series will continue on Thursday, November 29, at 12:00 noon in Colhoun A.

The program, “Food, Community, Mercy and Justice,” will be presented by Mark Jensen, PhD, Teaching Professor of Pastoral Care and Pastoral Theology at Wake Forest University School of Divinity.

Dr. Jensen’s PhD work was in pastoral care, psychology of religion, and theology. His current research and teaching interests lie at the intersections of faith, health, food systems, sustainability and community. In discussing the resources of the Christian tradition, particularly the Eucharist, that inform our mandate to engage with our neighbors and move toward beloved community, Dr. Jensen will explore the realities of food insecurity, telling stories and sharing facts about the crisis of hunger in our own community and how we, as Christians, can gain awareness and come to action.

Bring your own lunch. Beverages will be provided. All are welcome.